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Start Your New Week with a Word of Edification, Exhortation and Comfort from Daniel Botkin

Welcome to the Gates of Eden Blog ~ New posts weekly at 8PM following Shabbat

February 2, 2020

Compromise can be good or bad, depending on the situation. It can be good when trying to make a decision that will satisfy everyone. For example, if your wife wants to spend three hours at the zoo and you want to spend only one hour there, you can compromise and spend two hours at the zoo. That way you will both be disappointed and miserable, but at least you will be equally disappointed and miserable. Compromise can be good when a buyer and a seller are haggling over the price of an item. If the seller wants $300 but the buyer only wants to pay $100, they can compromise and settle for a price of $200. That way they will both feel like they were deprived of $100. So compromise can sometimes be a good thing. However, when God makes strong, sure demands—“Thou shalt" or "Thou shalt not"—compromise is out of the question. When Yahweh said to Pharaoh, "Let My people go," there was to be no compromise, no haggling over the

May 12, 2019

As I write this, Passover, the festival of freedom, has passed. Now we are counting the seven Sabbaths to Shavuot (Pentecost), the anniversary of the giving of the Law at Mount Sinai. The rabbis say that Passover isn't completely over until Pentecost. Why? Because freedom without law is anarchy. After God redeemed the children of Israel by the blood of the Passover lambs and freed them from Egypt, He did not tell them they were now free to do whatever they pleased. No, He brought them to Mount Sinai and told them "I am Yahweh thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage" (Ex. 20:2). Then He gave commandments, starting with the "Top Ten," to instruct His redeemed people how to live in freedom. Deuteronomy 6:23 says that Yahweh brought them out from Egypt so that He might bring them into the Promised Land. God's call to leave one place is always followed by God's call to go to another place. God

January 13, 2019

Compromise can be good or bad, depending on the situation. It can be good when trying to make a decision that will satisfy everyone. For example, if your wife wants to spend three hours at the zoo and you want to spend only one hour there, you can compromise and spend two hours at the zoo. That way you will both be disappointed and miserable, but at least you will be equally disappointed and miserable. Compromise can be good when a buyer and a seller are haggling over the price of an item. If the seller wants $300 but the buyer only wants to pay $100, they can compromise and settle for a price of $200. That way they will both feel like they were deprived of $100. So compromise can sometimes be a good thing. However, when God makes strong, sure demands—“Thou shalt" or "Thou shalt not"—

April 15, 2018

As I write this, Passover, the festival of freedom, has passed. Now we are counting the seven Sabbaths to Shavuot (Pentecost), the anniversary of the giving of the Law at Mount Sinai. The rabbis say that Passover isn't completely over until Pentecost. Why? Because freedom without law is anarchy. After God redeemed the children of Israel by the blood of the Passover lambs and freed them from Egypt, He did not tell them they were now free to do whatever they pleased. No, He brought them to Mount Sinai and told them "I am Yahweh thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage" (Ex. 20:2). Then He gave commandments, starting with the "Top Ten," to instruct His redeemed people how to live in freedom.

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