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Start Your New Week with a Word of Edification, Exhortation and Comfort from Daniel Botkin

Welcome to the Gates of Eden Blog ~ New posts weekly at 8PM following Shabbat

January 5, 2020

“To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven....” (Eccl. 3:1) From Ecclesiastes chapter 3, we learn that the Creator has specific times and seasons for different things. We see this truth about times and seasons manifested in the life cycle, in human experience, in nature, in agriculture, and even in history. There was a specific time in history to conquer Canaan. It could not be done in Abraham’s time, “for the iniquity of the Amorites [was] not yet full” (Gen. 15:16). There was a specific time in history when the Messiah was scheduled to come. “When the fullness of the time was come, God sent forth His Son” (Gal. 4:4). In the Parable of the Wheat and the Tares, Yeshua used agricultural

December 22, 2019

The Hanukkah story is found in the Book of Maccabees, a Jewish inter-testamental book. The Jews, to whom "were committed the oracles of God" (Rom. 3:2), never considered Maccabees to be Divinely-inspired, authoritative Holy Scripture. Nonetheless, Maccabees is an important book in Jewish history.

   The Book of Maccabees is not inspired, but it is inspiring, which is probably the reason it was included, along with a few other apocryphal books, in the original KJV Bible.

   Curiously, the historical events in Maccabees, though not included in the Biblical canon, are in fact prophesied in the Bible. To understand this extra-Biblical book from a Biblical perspective requires a familiarity with the Book of Daniel and some knowledge of history.

   In Daniel chapter 2, Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, had a dream in which he saw a great image of a metallic man. The head was of gold, the breast and arms of silver, the belly and thighs of brass, the legs of iron, and the feet part of ir...

September 22, 2019

The word apostasy does not appear in the 1611 KJV, but according to Webster's it has been in the English language since at least the 14th century. The English word apostasy is a transliteration of the Greek word apostasia. The Gingrich Shorter Lexicon defines it as "rebellion, abandonment, apostasy." Strong's defines it as "defection from truth." According to Strong's, the word apostasia is formed by attaching the apo- prefix to stao, a word related to stemi ("stand"). Regardless of how those ancient Greek speakers formed the word apostasia, it means defection from truth; rebellion, abandonment, apostasy. These lexicon definitions leave a couple of questions unanswered, namely: From which elements of truth do apostates defect? What specifically is it that apostates rebel against and abandon?

December 16, 2018

“To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven....” (Eccl. 3:1) From Ecclesiastes chapter 3, we learn that the Creator has specific times and seasons for different things. We see this truth about times and seasons manifested in the life cycle, in human experience, in nature, in agriculture, and even in history. There was a specific time in history to conquer Canaan. It could not be done in Abraham’s time, “for the iniquity of the Amorites [was] not yet full” (Gen. 15:16). There was a specific time in history when the Messiah was scheduled to come. “When the fullness of the time was come, God sent forth His Son” (Gal. 4:4).

December 2, 2018

The Hanukkah story is found in the Book of Maccabees, a Jewish inter-testamental book. The Jews, to whom "were committed the oracles of God" (Rom. 3:2), never considered Maccabees to be Divinely-inspired, authoritative Holy Scripture. Nonetheless, Maccabees is an important book in Jewish history. The Book of Maccabees is not inspired, but it is inspiring, which is probably the reason it was included, along with a few other apocryphal books, in the original KJV Bible. Curiously, the historical events in Maccabees, though not included in the Biblical canon, are in fact prophesied in the Bible. To understand this extra-Biblical book from a Biblical perspective requires a familiarity with the Book of Daniel and some knowledge of history.

September 2, 2018

The word apostasy does not appear in the 1611 KJV, but according to Webster's it has been in the English language since at least the 14th century. The English word apostasy is a transliteration of the Greek word apostasia. The Gingrich Shorter Lexicon defines it as "rebellion, abandonment, apostasy." Strong's defines it as "defection from truth." According to Strong's, the word apostasia is formed by attaching the apo- prefix to stao, a word related to stemi ("stand"). Regardless of how those ancient Greek speakers formed the word apostasia, it means defection from truth; rebellion, abandonment, apostasy. These lexicon definitions leave a couple of questions unanswered, namely: From which elements of truth do apostates defect? What specifically is it that apostates rebel against and abandon? If we look at how the word apostasis is used in the New Testament, it will help answer these questions, and will give us a clearer understanding of w...

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